That Twist

Brushwork, Projects Series

In the mid-Sixties, twenty year old German countess Vera Gottliebe Anna Gräfin von Lehndorff-Steinort was transformed into the now legendary model known as Veruschka. Photographer Richard Avedon, who I recall as that era’s Annie Leibovitz [as in “you know you’ve arrived if you’re posing for…”]  produced many of his fashion iconic images with Veruschka.  The stunning photo below was taken during Avedon’s tenure at Vogue.

Black and white photo of Veruschka taken by Richard Avedon

Richard Avedon photo of Veruschka, 1967

My own take on that photo became a kind of neon negative, done in gouache and watercolor:

Gouache and watercolor painting of Veruschka in reds and purple against a bright yellow background

That Twist

Life Drawing: Mid-Century Style

Brushwork, Projects Series

One can never predict what sort of setting will be staged before entering the studio since I’ve joined this life drawing group. For last night’s session, our model Ashley was seated upon a truly far-out, vintage, mid-century chair – with its matching turquoise ottoman! After bringing my sketches home, I was compelled to add color to this particular one. Yet, with a light hand. [Yeah – imagine that!]

ashley-with-overlay

Ashley in Mid-Century

 

Life Drawing: Tattoo

Brushwork, Projects Series

Twenty years or so [gulp!] had passed since my occasional forays with life drawing groups. Three weeks ago I decided to delve in again after finding a group here in Mystic. This prospect was not without a fair amount of personal fear… Yet, the members of this group, who are all quite talented and skilled individuals? They made me feel not only made me welcome and [very much needed] encouraged! And for last night’s session, I brought my own box of colors along.  From the image here, you can see I ditched my graphite pencils mid-way and went bananas with the colors.

Watercolor pencil sketch of a female nude with a focus on her back and the tattoo at her hip

Tattoo

Hyunji in Marc

Brushwork, Projects Series

First, an apology to adorable model Hyunji Shin. When working from Terry Tsiolis’ photo [in an editorial from the July 2018 issue of Elle] my foremost intent was to depict this incredible outline of the Marc Jacobs gown; I hardly did justice in Hyunji’s face! Yet, painting wet on wet is still rather foreign to me. One has to relinquish a lot of control – and those who know me will understand…

Watercolor fashion illustration of model Hyunji Shin in a fuchsia Marc Jacobs gown, from photo by Terry Tsiolis

Hyunji in Marc

 

 

Shear Blue Gloves

Brushwork, Projects Series

There are fashion magazine clippings which I have kept in a binder over the years… [And I do try to keep impulsive clipping at a reasonable binder management level. To “try”, being relative.] My most recent muse came by way of W Magazine and, more to the point, photographer Willy Vanderperre. His photograph offered me two elements I could not resist: lovely hand gesturing and challenging shadows. And I title this as Shear over Sheer because most challenging for me was in knowing when and what to omit.

Watercolor illustration of a Willy Venderperre photo featuring a woman wearing a military jacket and hat, with blue mesh gloves

Shear Blue Gloves

 

Galliano’s Peacock

Brushwork, Projects Series

From a Rossettiesque photo by Peter Lindbergh, a Galliano gown is featured. I liked the near weariness in the model’s pose. And while the original photo [featured in Vogue, I believe] had her set against dark greens and what looked like ivy growing from the ground, I chose to add a bed of Iris instead. As my own Iris is now in bloom, will I follow them?

watercolor painting of a red haired woman wearing a Galliano gown. Featuring Iris bloom in the background, with the gown in the colors of a peacock.

Galliano’s Peacock

The Hands

Brushwork, Projects Series

There is an adorable model who is not entirely depicted in this piece. And when I searched on photographer Marc de Groot’s online portfolio to look for her name, it couldn’t be found… But it was her hands that I loved most. Me, being me, I took some liberties with both her hair and the corset she wore. Maybe I should be calling her “Little Peacock”?

watercolor painting taken from a photo by Marc de Groot of a black female model, featuring her hands

The Hands

*Also, a thanks to the inspired work of Mr Barry Blitt!

Live! At the Green Marble!

Brushwork

I suppose it was inevitable. The time of arrival – when I would no longer have a mutually exclusive relationship with my own works. While I enjoy the kindness and support of my web base, hand rendered art really needs to be exposed to natural light. All of this to say, my own is now up at the Green Marble Coffee House for the entire month. And I would love for you to have a look!

A promotional flyer announcing an exhibit at the Green Marble Cafe, which is titled Riff Raff

September Show at Green Marble

 

 

“Solange”

Brushwork

The gown. That hair! Solange, that is. And with such an already musical name like that, why call this anything else? The source of it all can be seen on Elle.

I used some metallic watercolors for this 9″ x 12″ painting – a size which exceeds my scanning bed. The glint of the metallic gets lost on a monitor but I’m happy enough with the outcome here.

watercolor painting of a gown designed by Issey Miyake with only the model's hair featured behind the gown

Solange

Cavalli Captured in “Free Fall”

Brushwork

Rita Ora is featured within “Paper” magazine’s October issue, wearing a Roberto Cavalli dress – which in reality is what I would call a peacock-blue color. While Rita is a sensation, that Cavalli dress just had to taken for my Diaphanous series. And whatever the blue that it is, I rendered it instead in orange. The two alien objects depicted were taken from the same editorial [photographed by Nicolas Moore – no relation] are tracings from Rita’s zig zag bobby pinned crown.

cavalli dress painted in orange watercolors with two abstract elements

Free Fall

“Gelug-pa” [Yellow Hat]

Brushwork

Among my collection of books on Buddhism, “Tibet” by Michael Willis is a personal favorite for its enhanced colors in the book’s photographs. Tibetan monks can be seen wearing majestic hats, which are shaped like crests and appear as if they are rays of the sun upon their heads. Yet there are also more sobering photos of traditional prayer flags that have been reduced to tatters – although still casting wishes of world peace. This 8″ x 7.5″ was painted with both watercolors and ink.

A Tibetan buddhist monk hat seen against a lime yellow sky and decaying prayer flags

“Gelug-pa” [Yellow Hat]